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  1. Examples of “mythology”
  2. Mythology | Definition of Mythology by Merriam-Webster
  3. Mythology : Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes (Reprint) [Paperback]

Samantha Mulder 's abduction, the impotus for Mulder's research into the paranormal. It should be noted that some key mythology characters also appear in Monster of the Week episodes; notably, Deep Throat , X and the Cigarette Smoking Man each appear in episodes which involve government activities. Furthermore, as his role expanded, Walter Skinner appears in more Monster of the Week episodes.

There are 68 episodes in the Mytharc from the original run including the movie and the feature length finale as one episode. There are 5 episodes in the new mini-series, bring the total to Season premieres and finales always focus on the mythology arc, with the premieres typically continuing on the events of the previous seasons finale. I know most of my real life friends read this in the 10th grade, but my class read The Odyssey only and I've always meant to get to this book but didn't until now.

I listened to the audio of this book during my work commutes, and I liked it because it was a 4 stars Basically, this gif sums up most of Greek mythology: Not even kidding a little bit. I listened to the audio of this book during my work commutes, and I liked it because it was a bunch of stories so I didn't have to keep track of a lot. Many stories were familiar, some I had heard different versions and some I had never heard. Hamilton, while not indulging in graphic details, does not shy away from some of the harsher aspects of these stories and I found myself making faces while listening.

I also really liked how Hamilton told the reader her sources on where she got these stories from and if from different writers, how many years apart they were. I was a history major in college, so this was fascinating to me. I get that it's not for everyone, but if you want to learn more about mythology in general, this is the book for you. I declared August "History Month" and read, amongst various others, Bulfinch's Mythology of which I was quite disappointed. In my research of his work and how it came to be I found a reference to this book by Edith Hamilton, who superseded Mr. Bulfinch in most classrooms.

Thus I read this book in an attempt to find a better written encyclopedia. Unfortunately, I did not succeed. To clarify: this book IS better written than the one by Mr. One reason is that Edith Hamilton was a scho Hm. One reason is that Edith Hamilton was a scholar. Garrett European Fellowship. Her father had begun teaching her Latin, then French, German, and Greek when she was only 7 years old which probably was a factor in her interests later and her great scholarly success.

In she moved back to Germany with her sister to study humanities and classics at the university of Munich the then centre of classical studies. Edith Hamilton and her sister were among the first women to audit classes her sister published an autobiography detailing their life in Germany even. Originally, her plan had been to earn a doctoral degree definitely not easy at the time but then she was persuaded to return to the US to become head of the recently opened Bryn Mawr Preparatory School for Girls in Baltimore.

She never completed her doctoral degree but she did become an "inspiring and respected head of the school for twenty six years" bringing new ideas to an old system.

Strange Similarities Between Greek And Indian Mythology

Only after retiring did she start to write books, which explains why this book was published only when she was 62! As she has said herself in some interviews, her passion was for the Greeks which definitely shows in this book and is my main criticism. This book is advertised as a source on mythology in general, but it isn't. The main body of work is about the Greeks, added to by Roman mythology which mostly is adapted Greek mythology if we're being honest.

Almost as an afterthought, she included only 20 pages of Norse mythology. Nothing else is mentioned!

Examples of “mythology”

The Greek parts are written very well and the author's passion for the subject is clear throughout. All her knowledge came from classic literature; she has never been to Greece, and never participated in archaeology. Of course that isn't necessary in order to produce a good book but it shows that her views although she was a scholar were influenced and limited by the sources she read.

While I was pleased to see that Hamilton had included the Volsunga saga in the chapter about Norse mythology in many books it is replaced by the Nibelungenlied which was penned much later , she dismissed the saga by saying that the story is so well-known thanks to the Nibelungenlied that the original can be told briefly and THAT is an absolute no-go for me. It is precisely the original stories I want to be told about or at least I want a thorough comparison!

Moreover, the one thing I expect at the very least from an encyclopedia of mythology is a good overview. However, this book does not. Other cultures aren't even referenced. If she had titled her book correctly, I really wouldn't mind. It's a nice book about the very much related mythology of the Greeks and the Romans. However, I really need to point this out again: this is supposed to be a comprehensive work of mythology as a whole! Sorry, but this was just as disappointing as Mr. Bulfinch's cuts and changes to myths which accounts for the low rating if there was a half-star rating system here, it would get more than Bulfinch's Mythology but as it is It is a shame since the writing style was much more engaging but it wouldn't be right to rate it any higher.

View all 22 comments. Pindar in the early fifth century tells the tale about the feast Tantalus made the gods and protests that it is not true. The punishment of Tantalus is described often, first in the Odyssey , from which I have taken it. Amphion's story, and Niobe's, I have taken from Ovid, who alone tells them in full. For Pelops winning the chariot race I have preferred Apollodorus, of the first or second century A. The story of Atreus' and Thyestes' crimes a Pindar in the early fifth century tells the tale about the feast Tantalus made the gods and protests that it is not true.

The story of Atreus' and Thyestes' crimes and all that followed is taken from Aeschylus' Oresteia. I'd started reading the introductory material by the translator, but it was so long, so involved What's more displaying my ignorance here I was confused over the title of the play, and some of the main protagonists of the play, the Furies.

They are represented by a chorus, pursuing Orestes for his murder of his mother. But where does the title come from? I picked up some info somewhere in the edition I'm reading, and finally realized that in the climactic section of the play the Furies are rebranded by Athena into the Eumenides - a name that means Kindly Ones - thus changing them from a group seeking revenge and retribution the old way that humans responded to murder to a group which provides a higher moral choice to human kind, through the institution of justice. But before I let it go, I picked up Hamilton's book, and checked out the index entries for Eumenides and Furies see Erinyes - so to Erinyes, where among other entries was Orestes pursued by, - which closed the circle.

Those three pages were near the end of an eighteen page chapter on the House of Atreus. As I started looking through this to get to my point I realized that this chapter told the story of this house in a more illuminating way than the somewhat overly cerebral, mammoth introduction in my copy of Oresteia.

So, I thought I'd throw in these words about this quite wonderful book, most of which I've never read in the decades that I've owned it basically having used it as a reference book. As hinted above, the book has a pretty detailed, and very useful, index. There are drawings by Steele Savage, some full-page in my Mentor edition of sometime after , which was at the time the forty-fourth printed of Hamilton's book, first printed in It is still in print.

In the spoiler I've put the table of contents. If you check it out, you'll see the wonderful way that Hamilton has organized it. And you'll see why the book isn't titled Greek Mythology. How the World and Mankind WereCreated 4. Cupid and Psyche 6. The Quest of the Golden Fleece 8. Perseus Theseus Hercules The Fall of Troy The Adventures of Odysseus The Stories of Signy and Sigurd Feb 22, Ashley rated it really liked it Shelves: read-harder-challenge , history , classics , shop-on-your-own-shelves , folklore-and-mythology , treasure-and-adventure , illustrated.

This is one of those books you hear about and then buy in a used bookstore and it languishes on your bookshelves for years until you finally pick it up, and then you just end up thinking to yourself, why didn't I pick this up sooner? Only, it's also one of those books that really works better as a reference than as a book you sit down and read from cover to cover. I read this book over the course of most of February, in bits and pieces, and it worked well that way.

This book is a classic for a re This is one of those books you hear about and then buy in a used bookstore and it languishes on your bookshelves for years until you finally pick it up, and then you just end up thinking to yourself, why didn't I pick this up sooner? This book is a classic for a reason. It's at once a primer on world mythology and a pretty exhausting compendium of pretty much any myth or godlike figure you'd want to know about with an emphasis on western mythologies, which is a bit of a shame; I would have liked to see what Hamilton would have had to say about eastern myths, or African ones.

But my favorite bits were actually her little insights here and there into how the mythology was influenced by the historical culture of the times. I loved when she took little digs at historical writers, like Sophocles or Pliny or whoever. There was this one guy, whose name I'm forgetting at the moment, whom you can tell she just despised, but was too polite to say. And this dude lived 2, years or more before she did! She spends the most time on Greek mythology; it seems to be her favorite. And she made the claim in one of the intros that the Greeks' mythology was different from the others, because reasons.

At that point I was like, okay lady, but maybe its just your favorite and you're kind of biased. Anyway, definitely a valuable book to have on my shelves. Read Harder Challenge A book of mythology or folklore. View all 4 comments. Nov 04, Christopher marked it as to-read. Only made it to page , but someday I'll finish it.

In the meantime, some paintings of a few myths I did read: John William Waterhouse, Echo and Narcissus , in which Echo who can only echo what other people say fails to save Narcissus from drowning himself while admiring his own wonderful visage. Francisco de Goya, Saturn Devouring His Son , in which the titan Saturn eats all his children so that they won't be the death of him. Amphora depicting Odysseus and his men blinding the Cyclopean Polyphemus, c. Sep 17, Jennifer rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Students. Shelves: classics. I believe, deep in my heart, that everyone who has attended high school in the past twenty to thirty years or so in the United States, at least owned a ratty, most likely used copy of this work at one time or another.

This book has been on the required reading list of so many schools that nearly everyone has seen it, owned it, and opened it at least twice. This is one only two such books I still have, 15 years out of high school: this and Strunk and White. This is a good book to have lying arou I believe, deep in my heart, that everyone who has attended high school in the past twenty to thirty years or so in the United States, at least owned a ratty, most likely used copy of this work at one time or another.

This is a good book to have lying around the house, not because you need it every day, but because it is a great reference for things like settling family bets and cheating on the brown questions in Trivial Pursuit. Dig it out of the boxes in your basement sometime, under the term paper from freshman comp, and have a look over it. It really is a great reference guide to ancient mythos, it's easily accessible, and well written.

Generations of high school teachers can't be all THAT wrong. Well, except maybe for making us all read Moby Dick. Nov 05, Paige Bookdragon rated it it was amazing Shelves: before-goodreads , favorites , mythology. You can never forget your first love.


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Sep 10, Welwyn Wilton Katz rated it it was ok Shelves: myths-sagas-legends. This book is very hard to classify. Doesn't the title make you think "World Mythology"? Well, if it did, you would be wrong. I bought this book, looking forward to especially a female viewpoint of comparative mythology from various different countries around the world. What I got was an extremely thorough set of retellings with impeccably named sources by Hamilton of virtually every classical Greek and Roman myth ever told , with the very strange inclusion of approximately 20 pages of Nors This book is very hard to classify.

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Mythology | Definition of Mythology by Merriam-Webster

What I got was an extremely thorough set of retellings with impeccably named sources by Hamilton of virtually every classical Greek and Roman myth ever told , with the very strange inclusion of approximately 20 pages of Norse myths. I don't ever object to reading Norse myths. They are my favourite, since they make between them almost a linear single story with cause-and-effect leading us from the creation of the world to its inevitable destruction.

I do admit to feeling offended, almost, that this amazing body of Norst myth should be included as an afterthought in 20 pages of a book nearly main pages long, leaving out all the things that make the Norse world view make so much sense. I was pleased to see the Volsungasaga included, since it is so often replaced by the Nibelungenlied the Germanic version of Sigfried and his messed up love life , but then as I read it I found to my dismay: "The story of Siegfried is so familiar that that of his Norse prototype Sigurd can be briefly told. Does Edith Hamilton not care that the prototype is more important than the bastardized version invented by Germanic peoples?

There are reasons for the re-invention of the Sigurd story that are not entirely pleasant, and the re-invention of that story as the Wagnerian Ring Saga in opera. These reasons are unsavory and political, the stories are later, and they are unsatisfactory in the extreme, compared to the Volsungasaga. Okay, enough of my own particular hobby horse. It's time to ask why Hamilton was so extraordinarily thorough with Greek myth and Roman, while aware that Roman stories are nearly all renamed versions of the Greek tales , and yet she left out so many other myths so much older and so much more important, for example The Epic of Gilgamesh, perhaps the oldest written story on Earth, which relates the story of the historical King of Uruk from Ancient Sumeria BCE originally on 12 clay tablets in cunieform script.

This astoundingly important tale in human history is completely ignored by Hamilton. So are all the myths of the rest of the world. I would like to give this book five stars for its really complete and fairly narrated Greek mythos, but since it leaves out the whole rest of the world except as above , I can only give two stars at most.

If the title of the book had been "Greek Mythology", I think I could have given it five stars. But then it would have had to compete with so many other works about Greek mythology, that probably the publishers said to change the name and add something that wasn't Greek. Sorry for the disillusionment about the publishing trade, but I've been there. View all 6 comments. Audiobook This book, aside from fairy tales, has introduced me to the world beyond our reach. I first had this book because back in high school, we were required to read it. I never really understood back then why it seemed that I was one of the few who enjoyed reading this and majority of our class despised having to be given the assignment to read it.

I always found it entertaining. Well, the first few stories were a bit tedious but it was a foundation that helped me understand the other tales so it was This book, aside from fairy tales, has introduced me to the world beyond our reach. I look up to it so much for being the root of letting me grow as a reader and aided me to open my eyes and mind to a world of vast imagination, creativity and foreign culture.

For more of my reviews, please visit my blog: The Blair Book Project www. Oct 08, Michael Finocchiaro rated it it was amazing Shelves: englishth-c , greek-classic , mythology. Edith Hamilton was probably how I discovered mythology myself. I have an old tattered paperback copy of this which helped guide me through the Odyssey and the Iliad.

I haven't attempted Ovid or Hesiod, but this is where I would undoubtedly start whenever decide to do so. I was happy to have the recommendation of Edith Hamilton's Mythology from my Goodreads friend, Beverly about a year ago, when I was looking for a book that would help me understand this subject better.

Mythology : Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes (Reprint) [Paperback]

There is a lot of information which I preferred to read a little at a time which took almost a year to finish. Do I remember all in this book? You got to be kidding, I remember the basics and it has already helped in my classic reads when these figures show up and if my memory fails, I can look he I was happy to have the recommendation of Edith Hamilton's Mythology from my Goodreads friend, Beverly about a year ago, when I was looking for a book that would help me understand this subject better.

You got to be kidding, I remember the basics and it has already helped in my classic reads when these figures show up and if my memory fails, I can look here as a reference. I found zero errors in this Kindle edition. Worthy of the time to read especially for those not familiar with mythology. View all 7 comments. I remember reading this over and over when I was in high school, just for my own pleasure. Then I got to college, and took an actual mythology class, and the first thing the professor said was, "I hope you all haven't been reading junk like Edith Hamilton.

Well, most of his problem was with those bite-sized little rundowns of the myths, which is what I liked about it. It's a nice survey of Greek mythology, an introduction, if you will. There are a few inaccuracies, and she barely mention I remember reading this over and over when I was in high school, just for my own pleasure. There are a few inaccuracies, and she barely mentions things like Hercules' trials or the Voyage of the Argo, which are studied in much greater depth generally.

The inaccuracies are some names that she's gotten wrong, which may or may not be typos. My biggest complaint is that she doesn't go much into the Norse mythology my favorite , which would have been fine, except for her attitude in the intro that she doesn't get into it more because it basically isn't worth her time or anyone else's. View all 3 comments. Jun 22, Sara rated it really liked it Shelves: classics. A refresher in the Greek and Roman gods, in preparation for reading some classic literature later in the year.

I've been reading on this collection of myths for almost a month, and I really didn't want to come up for air. A one sentence summary: these stories are the best stories of all time. There are stories about every possible themedeath, work, struggle, sadness, love, hate, war, revenge, retribution. Because these stories are deeply embedded in our culture they reverberate through the modern stories we hear. This is a must-read for everyone. Cautionary note: Edith Hamilton isn't afraid to share he I've been reading on this collection of myths for almost a month, and I really didn't want to come up for air.

Cautionary note: Edith Hamilton isn't afraid to share her thoughts about all the sources she draws upon to write these tales; she is wildly opinionated.

Episode 27: Good Omens

And several times I was taken aback when she writes statements the original copyright date is aimed at her audience of the time which now feel off-putting. Oct 08, Mardin Uzeri rated it really liked it. Greek, Roman, and Norse mythologies have affected our modern cultures more than we might like to admit.

Those mythologies were used as means to explain the environment in which humankind lived, the natural phenomena they witnessed and the passing of time and seasons. Mythology has catalyzed the emergence of a rich and profound body of artistic works. In fact, this exactly peaked my interest in mythology in the first place.

Here are some of my favs: The titan Saturn eats all of his sons in fear of Greek, Roman, and Norse mythologies have affected our modern cultures more than we might like to admit. Here are some of my favs: The titan Saturn eats all of his sons in fear of their prophesied rebellion. Zeus, one of his sons, survives and eventually annihilates his father. A portrait of Medusa, anyone who looked at her would turn into stone. She was eventually subdued by the trick of a mirror. The Greek hero Orpheus doesn't accept the fate of his wife's death. He descends into the underworld the mythical resting place of the dead and tries to rescue her.

The tantalizing music of his lyre succumbs every creature, even the mighty guardians of the underworld. The Sphinx is said to have guarded the entrance to the Greek city of Thebes, and to have asked a riddle of travellers to allow them passage. The riddle was "Which creature has one voice and yet becomes four-footed and two-footed and three-footed?

Oedipus solved the riddle. This is a book I've had sitting on my shelves for a long time, and one I've flipped through several times to look up references from other books, titles, movies. I was finally encouraged to read the entire thing from having read Jesmyn Ward's Salvage the Bones , in which the year-old protagonist reads Mythology and makes comparisons to her own life, comparisons based mainly on the story of Jason and Medea.

One of my own personal favorites, as well, because Medea is a wickedly delicious charac This is a book I've had sitting on my shelves for a long time, and one I've flipped through several times to look up references from other books, titles, movies. One of my own personal favorites, as well, because Medea is a wickedly delicious character on her own.

I was a bit disappointed at this point, just because everything felt too brief; I wanted more meat. I got the meat a little later on, as Hamilton goes into more detail in some of the more familiar stories, such as Jason's quest for the Golden Fleece, Hercules and his Labors, and others. These chapters are great because it allows people who don't want to read some of those really old dead guys like Homer or Apollonius of Rhodes a chance to know what their stories were really about.

I would prefer people take the time to read each of them in their entirety, but since I'm not the boss of people, I agree that Hamilton's summaries are definitely better than nothing. These are fantastic stories. And most importantly, it stresses the importance of never giving up on the people you love. Tune in for a brief explanation of who Odin is, a not so brief discussion of how millennia of Romanization and Christianization affected the Norse myths, and an outright long rant about how Odin is the true villain of the Thor movies.

Discussion includes biblical references to demons and beasts, nazi occult societies, and even the modern mythology surrounding the legacy of Grigori Rasputin. And, of course, how all of these things tie into the first Hellboy movie. Welcome to the first of the honorable mentions episodes! This month, I'll be going over kelpies, as well as other water horses from European folklore. Tune in to learn about these truly disturbing creatures. Jack Frost is more than just a quintessential character from Christmas songs and movies.

Christmas is one of the most important Christian holidays, but the traditions carried out on this day are distinctly pagan in origin. Tune in to learn about the Roman origins of gift giving, the Celtic importance of mistletoe, the original Norse Santa figure, and so much more. It hunts in the frigid winter storms of the northern United States and Canada.

Slowly but surely, it has also begun to hunt in western literature and on the big screen. Listen and learn all about this cannibalistic monster and how it went from a little known creature from Algonquian myth to one of the most frightening stock character villains in pop culture. Loki is one of the most complicated and most beloved of all the antiheroes in the Marvel Canon Universe.

This episode explores the Norse mythology behind one of the most globally recognized trickster gods, as well as how that mythology influenced the character we see in Marvel. But what exactly makes a trickster different from any other character? And why do we all love them so much? This episode delves into the history of tricksters and explains the ways in which the ancient groundwork for this archetype has influenced some of our favorite modern day characters. But how accurate is it? A dark, chthonic figure falls in love with and kidnaps a beautiful springtime bride.

This tale is as old as, well, civilization. But why do we still love it? And where do we find it in pop culture? In part two of this discussion of how mythology has been used in political propaganda, we'll be delving into the topics of how modern myths like Social Darwinism, the Aryan Race Myth, the Divine Right of Kings, and White Man's Burden affected the twentieth century.

And just a quick warning: there will be some discussion on racism, imperialism, eugenics--as well as mentions Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. If these topics are upsetting to you, I would recommend skipping this episode. From politically motivated creation myths to modern pseudoscience, mythology and political propaganda have had quite the long and messy history with one another. In part 1 of this 2 part topic, we'll be going over what propaganda is and how it was used in the ancient world up until around Discussion includes imperial cults from around the world, the Divine Right of Kings, and creation myths with pro-war agendas.

Ever wonder why Neil Gaiman's "Coraline" is more frightening to adults than it is to kids?