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Clinical Genetics eBooks
Contents:


  1. Are genetics/genomics competencies essential for all clinical nurses?
  2. Nursing and genetics
  3. Lashley's Essentials of Clinical Genetics in Nursing Practice, Second Edition - Google книги
  4. Related Specialties

Are genetics/genomics competencies essential for all clinical nurses?

This book is a classic resource for nursing students and practitioners at all levels who need to acquire the knowledge and skills for using genomics in their practice. This completely updated second edition encompasses the many recent advances in genetic research and knowledge, providing essential new information on the science, technology, and clinical application of genomics.

It focuses on the provision of individualized patient care based on personal genetics and dispositions. The second edition is designed for use by advanced practice nursing programs, as well as undergraduate programs. It pinpoints new developments in prenatal, maternity, and pediatric issues and supplies new information on genomics-based personal drug therapy, environmental susceptibilities, genetic therapies, epigenetics, and ethics.

The text features a practical, clinically oriented framework in line with the core competencies defined by the AACN. It delivers information according to a life-span approach used in the practice setting. The second edition continues to provide basic information on genomics, its impact on health care, and genetic disorders.

It covers prevention, genetic counseling and referral, neuropsychiatric nursing, and public health.

Nursing and genetics

The core of the text presents information on a variety of diseases that affect patients throughout the life span, with specific guidance on the nursing role. Also included are tests for a variety of diseases and information on pharmacogenomics, which enable health care providers to select the best drugs for treatment based on a patient's genetic makeup. Plentiful case study examples support the information throughout. Additionally, an instructor's package of PowerPoint slides and a test bank are provided. New to the Second Edition: Completely updated Personal drug therapy based on genomics Environmental susceptibilities Prenatal detection and diagnosis Newborns and genetic screening Reproductive technologies Ethical issues Genetic therapies Epigenetics Includes content for graduate-level programs PowerPoint slides and a test bank for all student levels Key Features: Encompasses state-of-the-art genomics from a nursing perspective Provides a practical, clinically oriented life-span approach Covers science, technology, and clinical application of genomics Addresses prevention, genetic testing, and treatment methods Today's nurses must be able to "think genetically" to help individuals and families who are affected by genetic disease or contemplating genetic testing.

This is a classic resource for nursing students and practitioners at all levels who need to acquire the knowledge and skills for using genomics in their practice.

Lashley's Essentials of Clinical Genetics in Nursing Practice, Second Edition - Google книги

The completely updated second edition encompasses the many recent advances in genetic research and knowledge, providing essential new information on the science, technology, and clinical application of genomics. The second edition is designed for use by advanced practice nursing programs in addition to undergraduate programs. It pinpoints new developments in prenatal, maternity, and pediatric issues along with new information on genomics-based personal drug therapy, environmental susceptibilities, genetic therapies, epigenetics, and ethics.

Lyssna fritt i 30 dagar! Ange kod: play Du kanske gillar. Ladda ned. Spara som favorit. Completely updated to help nurses learn to ithink geneticallyi Todayis nurses must be able to ithink geneticallyi to help individuals and families who are affected by genetic disease or contemplating genetic testing. In other words, many nurses have minimal genetics education and may not feel comfortable incorporating genetics assessment and implications into a patient care plan.

Since , when human genome sequencing was completed, much genetic information and technology has been introduced into healthcare, requiring nurses to understand and translate these concepts to patients. How do we identify the red flags of inherited diseases, use a family assessment to recognize risk factors, develop a plan of care to educate patients, and ensure proper diagnosis? This article explains basic genetic terminology and processes and describes assessment steps to help clinical nurses care for and manage patients at risk for inherited adult-onset diseases.

See Genetics primer. Pharmacogenomics, the study of how a person metabolizes medications based on his or her personal genetic makeup, is one of the earliest applications of genetic and genomic research into clinical intervention.

Other Titles by Felissa R. Lashley

See Genetic markers for drug response and function. Pharmacogenomics has been most commonly used in psychiatry to determine drug choice and response, and in pain management to assess addiction potential. In addition, genetic testing can be used to tailor medication management to reduce and minimize side effects and promote treatment plan adherence. While not routinely used in general practice, this type of personalized medicine may become more commonplace as we begin to tie patient outcomes to reimbursement.

Related Specialties

Then, shortly after completion of human genome sequencing, ANA published the Essentials of Genetic and Genomic Nursing: Competencies, Curricular Guidelines, and Outcome Indicators , which was endorsed by 47 nursing organizations. These guidelines challenge nurses to:. To incorporate these competencies into practice, nurses need basic genetic and genomic knowledge. ANA provides a list of current genetics publications and resources that are earmarked for nurses.

The competencies divide the professional practice guidelines into four categories—nursing assessment; identification of hereditary risk; referrals; and education, care, and support. Essential nursing competencies include basic knowledge of genetic and genomic principles, genetic resources, current research, and professional guidelines and recommendations. Consider genetic, environmental, and genomic influences and risks during physical assessments, when collecting personal and family health histories, and when analyzing this information.

In developing the care plan in conjunction with the patient, integrate clinical judgment, patient preferences, evidence-based research, and family implications to plan genetic- and genomic-focused care. In the clinical setting, identification of hereditary risk begins with the primary care nurse. Obtain a three-generation family history to identify individual and family genetic risk factors. Note any missing information or unknown family history. See Family history resources.


  • Lashley's Essentials of Clinical Genetics in Nursing Practice, Second Edition.
  • Essentials of Clinical Genetics in Nursing Practice : Nursing Education Perspectives.
  • Through Minds’ Eyes.
  • Sitting Room.
  • Genetics and Medicine: Recommended Resources?
  • Genetic Medicine Resources: Starting Points for Clinicians;
  • Onna no kowai uso -iionna hodo uso wo tsuku (Japanese Edition).

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention This site provides links to genetic, genomic, and family health history resources, including case studies, for health professionals. Genetic Alliance The Genetic Alliance promotes patient awareness of family health history with links to downloadable booklets in English and Spanish to help patients share their histories with clinicians.

Surgeon General This patient-friendly website reviews the importance of family history and includes a web-based tool to organize and print family history information. For each family member, collect the following information:. After all data are gathered, analyze the information to determine patterns of both monogenic and multifactorial disease risks. See Understanding monogenic and multifactorial disorders. A drawn pedigree is a succinct way to visualize this information. Adult-onset monogenic disorders are single-gene disorders with disease signs and symptoms phenotypes that can begin during childhood.

More common are multifactorial disorders that result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. They occur any time during the lifespan, but tend to be more common in adulthood. Like monogenic disorders, many multifactorial disorders can be identified in multiple family generations.


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Electronic health records EHRs typically include a family history section for documenting health information over three generations. Ideally, an alert would prompt you to clarify information related to genetic risk factors. The best EHR would generate a pedigree based on the family history entered. Primary care, cardiology, oncology, and other specialties have published data that specify red flags in their specialty. See Genetic red flags. According to the Genetics in Primary Care Institute, red flags vary based on the assessment. For example, red flags for hereditary cancer will be different from those for a preconception evaluation.

When red flags are identified during the family history, you or the provider should make a referral to a genetic specialist. To help patients and families make informed decisions and to decrease their anxiety, provide information about the reasons for testing, types of tests, and benefits and risks.

Benefits of genetic testing include providing a definitive diagnosis, offering information related to familial risk, and identifying prevention , management, and treatment options. Risks include the potential for discrimination based on genetic results, anxiety over the uncertainty of incidental findings of unknown significance, and the psychological impact of what the findings mean. See Uses of genetic testing.

Diagnostic testing confirms or rules out a diagnosis. This testing is indicated when symptoms already exist. Carrier testing determines whether an individual is a carrier of a recessive or X-linked Mendelian disorder. Prenatal or antenatal testing looks for genetic and chromosomal disorders such as Down syndrome. Be aware of barriers to genetic technology and services, including culture, language, family values, traditions, religion, and health beliefs.

In addition, stay up-to-date on current health policy regarding reimbursement for genetic and genomic health services as well as genetic discrimination related to insurance and employment. Local and national resources can help facilitate referrals. Genetic services are frequently offered by specialty for example, cardiology or oncology , so keep a list of local resources. In addition to genetic and genomic referrals, the personal or family history may require risk-management referrals to appropriate specialists.

You can be instrumental in initiating these referrals and providing follow-up. The genetic testing process, from initial counseling through disclosure of test results, can take 4 weeks or more. During this time, you can offer emotional support and discuss potential strategies for action after the results are received.