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RYANODINE RECEPTOR GENES AND ISOFORMS
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  4. Series: Current Topics in Membranes

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Current Topics in Membranes provides a systematic, comprehensive, and rigorous approach to specific topics relevant to the study of cellular membranes. Each volume is a guest edited compendium of membrane biology. Praise for the Series: "In keeping with the high standards set by the editors Lysosomes and Membrane Function, Volume 84 in the Current Topics in Membranes series, highlights new advances in the field, with this volume presenting interesting chapters on a variety of topics, including Parasite invasion and PMR, Actin dynamics and myosin contractility during plasma membrane repair: Does one ring really heal them all?

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We would like to ask you for a moment of your time to fill in a short questionnaire, at the end of your visit. It was hypothesised that the MG23 bowl configuration is constructed from six asymmetric particles and can be readily constructed and disassembled.

The cation permeability of MG23 suggests that it could be implicated in this phenomenon. The specific physiological functions of TRPP2 in the distinct cellular compartments where it is located are still not fully understood. Again, the physiological relevance of the expression of this particular channel in the ER is not understood.

Serysheva (ed), Structure and Function of Calcium Release Channels, 1e

The expression profile suggests that TMEM16E plays multiple biological roles in the musculoskeletal system. He has developed many knockout mice models to shed light on the physiological roles of the various SR proteins.

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Series: Current Topics in Membranes

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Figure 2. Additional information Competing interests None of the authors has any conflicts of interests.

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